Self-myofascial release

sfmrIs your neck tight? Are your shoulders and hips stiff? Are your knees sore? If so then it is time to take your health into your own hands and start practicing self-myofascial release (SMFR). Don’t worry, it is not as complicated as it sounds. SMFR in more general terms simply means self-massage and is usually done using tools such as foam rollers, and lacrosse balls. It is a great cost-effective way to expedite recovery, correct muscle imbalances and increase physical performance.

You can learn many SMFR techniques in our new Foam Rolling & SMFR classes Tuesday and Friday mornings at 9:40 am or Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 9:00 pm.

Should I do SMFR before or after workout?
SMFR can be performed both before and after your work out. Unlike static stretching, SMFR does not create a strength deficit when used as a warm up for physical activities (Halperin et al. 2014, MacDonald et al. 2013, Sullivan et al. 2013). It is also a great way to mobilize stiff or impinged joints.

When used as a recovery activity, SMFR has been shown to decrease the experience of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), according to MacDonald et al. (2014) . This means that SMFR can be used effectively to both prepare for and recover from exercise.

References:
1. Halperin I, Aboodarda SJ, Button C, Andersen L, Behm D. Roller massager improves range of motion of plantar flexor muscles without subsequent decreases in force parameters. IJSPT 2014; 9(1): 92-102

2. Macdonald G, Button D, Drinkwater E, Behm D. Foam Rolling as a Recovery tool after an intense bout of physical activity. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2014;46(1):131–142

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Self-myofascial release

Some inspiration!

We all need some inspiration in our life. We like to look at the athletes at the Olympics, professional dancers and Hollywood celebrities. Maybe, just a bit, we aspire to be like them. Occasionally, we meet people in our immediate circle that inspire us. And every once in a while, if we are lucky, we meet people that truly awe us with their abilities.

We have a person like that in our midst. Most of our members know Yelena. Always there to help with membership issues and quick to respond to emails. On the mat she is quiet, but truly inspiring. Very few women can do what she can. And now, at almost 7-months pregnant with twins, she is still doing kettlebell classes and pull-ups.

So, have a look at this short video, share it with a friend, and if you know someone who is pregnant, pass this along. It is nice to be inspired by real people around us.

Watch now: Exercise during pregnancy is possible

Some inspiration!

SELF-DEFENCE WITH KYLE DUSKE

Self-defence can be a controversial topic. Different instructors have different ways and reasons for teaching self-defence. The beauty is that all of these different approaches are important and can be effective in the right situations. Here is the approach that our instructor, Kyle Duske, uses in his self-defence workshops.

IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT STRANGER DANGER
When I teach self-defence I often speak about domestic violence as I have grown up around domestic violence, and because most violent attacks are committed by offenders who are known to the victim. I find that most self-defence courses focus on stranger danger and can be excessive in their tactics. I try to teach fundamental physical skills  which are easy to remember, practice and apply. I pair these with a dialogue about the realities of violent offences and the importance of situational awareness.

THE TECHNIQUES ARE THE FUN PART
Learning self-defence can actually be a lot of fun. You learn new and effective techniques and roll-play how to use them to defend yourself against potentially violent attackers. This is a fun, physical, and exciting experience but the reality of self-defence is that it is not all about wrist releases and eye gouges. When exploring the topic of self-defence it is also important to talk about how to avoid dangerous situations, access crisis intervention and in the worst case scenarios find support after a violent attack has occurred.

FURTHER READING ON VIOLENT CRIME STATISTICS

BJS Violent Victimization Committed by Strangers, 1993-2010
NCJRS Violent Crime by Strangers and Non-strangers
RAINN Perpetrators of Sexual Violence: Statistics

 

SELF-DEFENCE WITH KYLE DUSKE

How often should I train?

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Many people have asked, “How often should I train?” Now, this can be a hard question to answer as it is very dependent on your current fitness level, lifestyle and long-term fitness goals. That being said there are a few basic guidelines that can help you get started.

Once a week
Intense exercise at least once a week can help you maintain your current fitness level and set a foundation for increased fitness in the future. If it has been ten years since the last time you really exercised, adding just one session of exercise to your weekly schedule is often more than enough to get things moving.

Two to three times a week
To see consistent progress in your health and fitness you will need to exercise at least two to three times a week. Training less will make it hard to develop proficiency in technical movements, and if you have been paying attention in class you know it is all technical. Even seemingly simple movements such as the Push-Up, Squat, Punch or Tenkan (an evasive technique taught in Aikido) can be constantly tweaked and refined.

Four or more times a week
If you want results and you want them fast then you need to work for them. To see drastic changes in body composition in a short time (three to six months) you will need to participate in intense exercise at least four or more times a week. However exercising at this level can increase the risk of overuse injuries, so it is very important that you are complimenting your exercise regimen with good nutrition, sleep and a well-thought-out recovery program.

Recovery
There are many ways to aid your recovery after exercise. Some of the most important are: nutrition, sleep, stretching, and mindful relaxation.

How often should I train?

Have you met Peter yet?

peterPeter started training Karate with his teenage son at Vancouver Mind-Body Centre in the Spring of 2016. Since then he has started to regularly attend our very popular Saturday morning flexibility class. He even completed the full 31 days of the Workout to Conquer Cancer with us in May 2017 as well as the 22 Pushup Challenge in July.

Both outside and inside the gym Peter is feeling stronger, healthier, calmer and more flexible than ever. Which is important when you work in the fast-paced film industry. The long hours on set were part of the reason Peter chose to start training with his son, making sure they get some quality time together every Monday night.

peter-1

When I started at VMBC, I would struggle through maybe nine sit-ups as the rest of the group completed their set of twenty five. I can now do a set of 25 sit-ups, 10 push-ups and still do plank. Climbing a rope for the first time was pretty awesome too.

As a side effect of Peter’s improved physical performance he has dropped from a size 36 pant to a size 33. You can’t complain about that!

Peter is excited to continue to work towards his 7th Kyu grading (Orange Belt) improve his flexibility and make kettlebells a part of his regular routine. It won’t be easy as this season of Super Girl is going to be busy, busy, busy, but he is up for the challenge.

What are your health and fitness goals for this season? Let us know for a chance to win a free 1-on-1 personal training session or a goal setting consultation, if you are not yet sure what your goals are.

Have you met Peter yet?

Have you met Stephanie yet?

stephanieStephanie started training at Vancouver Mind-Body Centre last Spring. It has been almost a year since then and she has come a long way. She started with personal training, only once a week. Then slowly moved into group classes. She now regularly attends two Kettlebell classes a week, and is working on fitting in a third.

When we asked why she chose VMBC this is what she had to say: “I have three young kids and when I have time to myself I want to relax, not work out. In order to successfully integrate a workout routine into my life, I needed a gym that was easily accessible. VMBC is close to my house, the classes are affordable, offered around the clock, only 30 minutes long and I could bring my baby!”

Remember climbing ropes in gym class? Stephanie does, and she finally made it to the top. “Rope climbing was a part of fitness assessments in elementary school. It was something I always wanted to do, but always failed at doing. One evening, a couple of months ago, after receiving a great tip for rope climbing, I attempted to climb the rope. To my immense surprise, pleasure and pride I climbed quickly to the top. Reaching the top made me feel strong, fit and glad I’d made the commitment to work out.”

Training should not just be about what you can do in the gym but rather how it effects your quality of life outside of the gym. Stephanie knows this well.

“After three pregnancies and very little strength training my body felt weak and soft. Since I’ve started training at VMBC I’ve felt so much stronger in my body, especially through my core. I can now easily do multiple sit-ups, whereas a year ago I could barely do one. And more importantly, I can more easily meet the demands of my three kids. I can carry them for longer, chase them through the park and throw them up in the air.” Isn’t amazing how taking just a little extra time for yourself, even as little as 1 to 2 hours a week, can help you interact with those around you better.

We look forward to helping Stephanie continue to move forwards with her health and fitness, and if she keeps consistent we are sure she can only get better. Are you ready to get started on your health and fitness journey? If so why not try a FREE class? If you have already started you may like to forward this on to a friend who needs a little inspiration.

Have you met Stephanie yet?

How Anthony Bourdain lost 35lbs

anthony-bourdain-lost-35lbsHave you ever taken a trip and come back 10lbs heavier? Now imagine the weight you would put on if your full time job was traveling and eating all of the worlds best foods. That is exactly what Anthony Bourdain does. So how does he keep from becoming over weight? The answer: Jiu-Jitsu.

Bourdain told the New Yorker that “Since he started doing jujitsu, three years ago, he has lost thirty-five pounds.” Not an easy feat for a celebrity chief in his 60’s. Now it’s not only the exercise, it never is. Training Jiu Jitsu has also changed the way Bourdain thinks about food.

“Now that he trains nearly every day in jujitsu, he tries to eat and drink more selectively. “Off camera, I don’t go around getting drunk at night,” he said during the meals we shared when he wasn’t shooting, Bourdain didn’t so much gorge himself as graze. A big bowl of pasta is hard to enjoy if you know it will render you sluggish the next morning, when a crazy-eyed mixed martial artist is trying to ease you into a choke hold.” (Patrick Radden Keefe, The New Yorker 2017)

If you want to eat like Anthony check out his Acai bowl recipe over at A.V. Club. If you want to train like him try one of our NEW Jiu Jitsu classes at Vancouver Mind-Body Centre.

How Anthony Bourdain lost 35lbs